Neal Green

Assistant Professor, School of Education

Our Stance

Our belief is students learning is more impactful when it occurs in an authentic setting. Students engaged in authentic activities are more apt to experience learning at a high level.  

Introduction

Our mission is to prepare Kendall College students to be "Ready for the World". We accomplish this through classroom learning experiences that provide a foundation of knowledge to act as a springboard for deeper exploration. Applied learning "refers to an educational approach whereby students learn by engaging in direct application of skills, theories and models"(Applied Learning - SUNY. (2016). Retrieved June 01, 2016, from https://www.suny.edu/applied-learning). The action-oriented concept of applied learning includes experiences whereby students "learn by doing", engage in important educational and job-related activities, and "build one or more real-world skill[s], which in turn provides instructors with "a mechanism to evaluate learning" at a high-level (UC San Diego, "What is applied learning", 2014).     

Benefits of Applied Learning

Applied learning has several benefits for students, instructors, and Kendall College. Specifically, applied learning experiences build a foundation for life-long learners who are educated and informed citizens.  

  • Translate classroom knowledge to real-world situations; 
  • Develop a deeper understanding of course materials;  
  • Gain real-world skills that are valued by potential employers and graduate programs; 
  • Explore career pathways; and, 
  • Build a network.  

Source: What is Applied Learning? (2016). Retrieved June 30, 2016, from https://real.ucsd.edu/students/what-is-applied-learning.html#What-are-some-examples-of-appli  

Applied Learning Activities For Your Classroom

Research: A systematic inquiry that investigates hypotheses, suggests new interpretations of data or texts, and poses new questions for future research to explore. Research can be conducted on-campus with faculty and research staff or off-campus with industries, research institutes, government agencies, non-profit organizations, community-based organizations, and more. 

Research Activities: Having Kendall College located in Chicago provides several opportunities for real-world research projects. The following link from the University of Iowa is meant to provide insight on what other institutions are doing to create authentic research activities with their students. Use your knowledge of Chicagoland and the specific needs for those in your discipline to create relevant research opportunities for your students.  

Source: Projects- Center for Research on Undergraduate Education. (2016). Retrieved June 30, 2016, from http://www.education.uiowa.edu/centers/crue/projects  

 Active Learning: "Have the students do something" rather than be passive recipients of knowledge.  

Active Learning Activities: Engage your face to face students in active learning activities that encourage cooperation, negotiation, and self-reflection. The linked article provides 40 active learning activities teachers can use to make their classroom more exciting and students more engaged.  

Source: Thompson, J. (2016). 40 Active Learning Strategies for Active Students. Retrieved June 14, 2016, from http://teaching.monster.com/benefits/articles/8414-40-active-learning-strategies-for-active-students-?page=1  

 Leadership: The ability to inspire or influence others to accomplish a common goal. Leadership opportunities involve strategic thinking, working in groups, problem solving, effective communication, decision-making, and more.  

Class Leadership Activities: The attached resource has dozens of activities you can use immediately in your classroom to build leadership skills for your students.  This Slideshare highlights icebreaker, energizer, team-building, and self-reflection activities to engage students to think as a leader.  

Source: Beggs, K., & Solheid, L. (2013, Summer). Leadership Games and Activities. Retrieved June 14, 2016, from http://www.slideshare.net/lsolheid/leadership-games-and-activities

Collaborative Learning: Structure class time for students to work together to promote cooperation, problem-solving, decision-making, and communication skills.   

Collaborative Learning Activities: The following resource has several examples of how to implement collaborative learning strategies in your classroom. Give these strategies a try and find what works best for you and your students.  

Source: Collaborative Learning: Group Work. (2012). Retrieved June 14, 2016, from http://www.cte.cornell.edu/teaching-ideas/engaging-students/collaborative-learning.html  

Simulations-Create lesson plans that ask students to participate in experiences that simulate real-life events.  

Ideas for Simulation Activities: Science Education Research Center at Carleton College

Collaborative Learning: Structure class time for students to work together to promote cooperation, problem-solving, decision-making, and communication skills.   

Collaborative Learning Activities: The following resource has several examples of how to implement collaborative learning strategies in your classroom. Give these strategies a try and find what works best for you and your students.  

Source: Collaborative Learning: Group Work. (2012). Retrieved June 14, 2016, from http://www.cte.cornell.edu/teaching-ideas/engaging-students/collaborative-learning.html

Active Learning: "Have the students do something" rather than be passive recipients of knowledge.  

On-Ground Active Learning Activities: Engage your face to face students in active learning activities that encourage cooperation, negotiation, and self-reflection. The linked article provides 40 active learning activities teachers can use to make their classroom more exciting and students more engaged. Thompson, J. (2016). 40 Active Learning Strategies for Active Students.  

Source: Retrieved June 14, 2016, from http://teaching.monster.com/benefits/articles/8414-40-active-learning-strategies-for-active-students-?page=1  

Online Active Learning Activities: Engage your online students through the use of collaborative teaching techniques to improve teaching and learning. The linked article from the University of Florida highlights "Best Practices" for online instructors to actively engage students learning at a distance. Active vs. Passive Learning in Online Courses. (2016, April 12).  

Source: Retrieved June 14, 2016, from http://citt.ufl.edu/online-teaching-resources/activelearning/active-vs-passive-learning-in-online-courses/

Problem-Based Learning: Improve teaching and learning in your online classroom with problem-based activities that promote real-world experiences to engage students in meaningful learning opportunities.  

Problem-Based Activities: Online Problem-Based Activities - This link from the University of Florida provides "Best Practices" for online instructors interested in problem-based learning for their classroom.  

Source: Problem-Based Learning. (2015, March 12). Retrieved June 14, 2016, from http://citt.ufl.edu/online-teaching-resources/activelearning/problem-based-learning/

Community Engagement Project: Ask students to get involved in the community at a social or cultural level with activities that support your course learning outcomes.  

Community/Service Learning: Authentic learning experiences are a great strategy to engage students' in meaningful and impactful projects that will greatly enhance their education beyond the classroom. In their article, A Checklist for Implementing Service- Learning in Higher Education, researchers Jenkins and Sheehey (2012) identified four stages to follow when creating a community/service learning project.  

These Stages Include: 

  • Preparation 
  • Implementation-Performing the Service 
  • Reflection 
  • Demonstration/Celebration 

Source: Jenkins, A., & Sheehey, P. (2012, June 18). A Checklist for Implementing Service-Learning in Higher Education. Retrieved June 30, 2016, from http://jces.ua.edu/a-checklist-for-implementing-service-learning-in-higher-education/  

Online Community/Service Learning: Here is an infographic that describes the decision making process for instructors considering online community/service learning projects for their classroom. 

Source:  https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/9285717/
online%20service%20learning%20infographic.pdf

 

 

Internships are another example of applied learning, which students complete outside the traditional classroom.  

See also: Experiential Learning, Active LearningGuided Instruction, and Collaborative Learning.

Resources

Articles  

"Today’s high-tech, global economy is fast-paced and moving forward every day, and we have to ensure that, above all else, we are preparing our students to be a part of it." You will find numerous resources, examples, and advice for implementing applied learning in your course: Applied Learning  

This link is an infographic created by Minnesota School of Business, Dean of faculty, Katherine O'Connell. "The Applied Learning Infographic is a Great Visual to Show 'We Care' in Action."

This easy-to-read article has several activities faculty can implement in their courses to promote active learning. As you read, you will notice how connected experiential learning, applied learning, and constructivism and often used interchangeably.The site was created to,"provide examples of ways teachers can incorporate constructivist practices of teaching and learning into their instruction, curriculum, and assessment practices": What Classroom Activities Reflect Constructivism?

This easy-to-read site created by the University of California at San Diego provides information on applied learning for students, faculty and staff: What is Applied Learning?

This site by the Science Education Resource Center at Carleton College (SERC) describes the "deep-learning" that occurs from using simulations in their science program: Why Teach with Simulations?

Blog post  

Six facets of applied learning with a bulleted list of details for each. 

Video  

Synopsis: Shenandoah University-See how Dr. Amy Sarch is "breaking boundaries of the classroom" with applied learning.